Politics as Unusual

ShadowsWhen a country obtains great power,
it becomes like the sea:
all streams run downward into it.
The more powerful it grows,
the greater the need for humility.
Humility means trusting the Tao,
thus never needing to be defensive.
A great nation is like a great man:
When he makes a mistake, he realizes it.
Having realized it, he admits it.
Having admitted it, he corrects it.
He considers those who point out his faults
as his most benevolent teachers.
He thinks of his enemy
as the shadow that he himself casts.
If a nation is centered in the Tao,
if it nourishes its own people
and doesn’t meddle in the affairs of others,
it will be a light to all nations in the world.
Tao Te Ching v61
Humility

 Line and Feather

Through the Eyes of LoveChrist Consciousness and Humanity
Be all you know is the past. It does not exist in the eyes of God. In the eyes of God, your knowledge is but dust in the eye of a child, blinding you to the splendor of Creation.
You know, in effect, nothing of eternal significance.
When you operate on the basis of your so-called knowledge, you are operating without divine foundation. Belief in your own knowledge is not belief in God. Trust in your own knowledge is not trust in God. No matter how much you learn within your present framework of finite knowledge, it will never be even one step closer to an understanding of God, the universe, or yourself.
Knowledge, as you presently understand it, will never bring you closer to Life.
Do not cling, in imagined righteousness, to this or that segment of your experience, as if this or that piece of the past were somehow worth the saving. “Well,” you say, “I will die to everything but this. This is too sacred. This means too much to me.” Let it go! Does it mean more than Life? You don’t need it anymore, whatever it might be.
From Chapter 6 Read more . . . The Starseed Transmissions, Ken Carey

Line and Feather

jk-rowlingField of Play
Imagination
JK Rowling, June 2008
President Faust, members of the Harvard Corporation and the Board of Overseers, members of the faculty, proud parents, and, above all, graduates.
The first thing I would like to say is ‘thank you.’ Not only has Harvard given me an extraordinary honor, but the weeks of fear and nausea I have endured at the thought of giving this commencement address have made me lose weight. A win-win situation! Now all I have to do is take deep breaths, squint at the red banners and convince myself that I am at the world’s largest Gryffindor reunion.
Read more . . .

Line and Feather

we-the-peopleThe American Presidency
And so the Presidential debate season comes to a close. In the next eighteen days, it is all about ‘We the People.’
There are several open issues for me: leadership, moral compass, temperament and the emotional maturity to drive toward optimal outcomes. In this context, the ability to discern between factual circumstances, disparate beliefs,  and the informed and uninformed opinions of others.
Facts

  1. World order is in a dramatic state of change as a result of globalization, population growth, age shift, decaying infrastructure and widespread global conflict.
  2. On November 8th registered voters in the United States will elect its 45th President who will be inaugurated on January 21st, 2017 for a four-year term. A total of 469 seats in the U.S. Congress (34 of 100 Senate seats and all 435 House seats) are up for election. One of nine Supreme Court justices remains in limbo with the Senate refusing to act on the current President’s nomination. Read more . . .
  3. The Commission for Presidential Debates orchestrated and controlled,in conjunction with the major media networks, the structure and content topics for the debates.

Observations for now . . .

  • Effective Presidential leadership, today more than ever, requires an understanding of the evolution of world order, boundaries and constraints of our global capabilities, a respect for our adolescence on the world stage, the enormity of our potential, respect for and ability to communicate complex issues to divergent perspectives, the ability to initiate agile and transparent public/private partnerships, engagement with the franchised, last but not least empathy and guidance for the disenfranchised.
  • Hammering on a problem (yelling) does not illuminate potential solutions
  • None of us have the ability to speak and listen at the same time
  • A picture is worth a thousand words
  • On the myriad of issues, whose job is it?
  • How do we create measures in electing our leaders (and colleagues)?
  • Lesson from a mentor, ‘Wed fast and repent at your leisure.’

Still listening for unanswered questions about our various roles and intersects?

  1. Federal Reserve
  2. United Nations
  3. NATO
  4. World Bank
  5. European Union
  6. Other important consortiums

God bless us each and every one. Tiny Tim

This entry was posted in Consider This!, Daily Devotional and Readings, Leadership and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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