Communications Many Forms

Realease with ForgivenessEase
Spirit within me is expressing in wise and wonderful ways.
I recognize that worry-thoughts are stumbling blocks on my way toward achievement. Consequently, if I worry that something is going to be difficult, it likely will be. So I open to the underlying potential in what might seem to be a difficulty. I know that all matters can be handled with ease as I let Spirit within express as me in wise and wonderful ways. I can do what is mine to do and do it well.
I am neither timid nor boastful. A feeling of ease–fortified by my awareness of my innate divinity–nudges me along, from thinking to planning to doing. From my inner, sacred reservoir, I call on wisdom and understanding, life and vigor to move me forward in both simple and complex activities.
I can do all things through him who strengthens me. Philippians 4:13
Daily Word
Courage

 Line and Feather

Guardian Angels 2Christ Consciousness and Humanity
Our communications during these closing years of the Seventies are reaching past the social fringe of your culture that was contacted during the Sixties. This time, we are reaching deep into the heart of global civilization. We are reaching many who are in what we call “lubricatory positions” in your society — individuals working in factories, teaching in schools, building your cities and expanding your science. We are not in much direct contact yet with government officials, nor with world bankers and international financiers. In most cases, these elements have surrounded themselves with ego mechanisms too complex to penetrate at this time.
Our first contacts with them will occur during the more powerful transmissions of 1987 to 1989. Those who we are contacting now, nonetheless, are critical enough in the maintenance of your social systems to ensure that the world will make some incredible leaps in consciousness during the next decade. The majority do not have room within their belief structures to accommodate so grand a being as an angel or extraterrestrial, so they respond to our influence as if it were coming from themselves. They feel good, they feel clear, they feel the changes in the air. They wake up a little, throw off some of their defense mechanisms and bring a newer and fresher perspective into each situation.
From Chapter 5 Read more . . . The Starseed Transmissions, Ken Carey

Line and Feather

storytellingField of Play
Storytelling
Storytelling is the social and cultural activity of sharing stories, often with improvisation, theatrics, or embellishment. Stories or narratives have been shared in every culture as a means of entertainment, education, cultural preservation and instilling moral values. Crucial elements of stories and storytelling include plot, characters and narrative point of view. The term ‘storytelling’ is used in a narrow sense to refer specifically to oral storytelling and also in a looser sense to refer to techniques used in other media to unfold or disclose the narrative of a story.
Storytelling predates writing, with the earliest forms of storytelling usually oral combined with gestures and expressions. In addition to being part of religious rituals, some archaeologists believe rock art may have served as a form of storytelling for many ancient cultures.[1] The Australian aboriginal people painted symbols from stories on cave walls as a means of helping the storyteller remember the story. The story was then told using a combination of oral narrative, music, rock art and dance, which bring understanding and meaning of human existence through remembrance and enactment of stories.[2] People have used the carved trunks of living trees and ephemeral media (such as sand and leaves) to record stories in pictures or with writing. Complex forms of tattooing may also represent stories, with information about genealogy, affiliation and social status.
Read more . . .

Line and Feather

we-the-peopleThe American Presidency
Seth Godin on Democracy this morning . . .

Ketchup and the third-party problem
Sir Kensington’s Ketchup is better ketchup. Most adults who try it agree that it’s more delicious, a better choice. Alas, Heinz has a host of significant advantages, including dominant shelf space, a Proustian relationship with our childhood and unlimited money to spend on advertising.
The thing is, you can buy Sir Kensington’s any time you want to. And when you buy it, that’s what you get.
You’re not buying it to teach Heinz a lesson. You’re buying it because that’s the ketchup you want.
The marketing of Sir Kensington is simple: If you want better ketchup, buy this, you’ll get it.

Elections in the US don’t work this way.
I’m calling it a third-party problem because the outcome of third-party efforts don’t align with the marketing (and work) that goes into them.
Ross Perot, the third-party candidate who ran against Bush and Clinton, cost Bush that election. The people who voted for Perot got Clinton, and it’s pretty clear that the Republicans learned nothing from this, as the next winning candidate they nominated was… George Bush.
Ralph Nader, the third-party candidate who ran against Bush and Gore, cost Gore that election. The people who voted for Nader got Bush, and it’s pretty clear that the Democrats learned nothing from this, as the next person they nominated was… John Kerry.

[Irrelevant aside: John Kerry was married to the heir of the Heinz Ketchup fortune.]

[I’m calling it a ‘problem’ because I have such huge respect for people who care enough and are passionate enough to support change. The problem is that since Gus Hall, and then John Anderson and then the more recent candidates, just about all the changes that third parties have tried to bring to national politics have foundered. It just isn’t a useful way to market change in this country.]
If enough people spent enough time, day after day, dollar after dollar, we could fundamentally alter the historic two-party system we have in the US. But it’s been shown, again and again, that the easy act of letting oneself off the hook by simply voting for a third-party candidate accomplishes nothing.
The marketing of the third-party candidate is: Teach those folks a lesson, plus, you’re not on the hook for what happens. But…
No one in government is learning a lesson.
And you don’t even get who you voted for.
The irony is not lost on me. A small group of voters who care a great deal are spending psychic energy on a vote that undermines the very change they seek to make.

It’s a self-defeating way of letting yourself off the hook, but of course, you’re actually putting yourself on the hook, just as you do if you don’t vote at all.
No candidate has earned a majority of all potential (regardless of registration) voters, not once in my lifetime. Which means that the people who don’t vote, or who vote for a third-party candidate, have an enormous amount of power. Which they waste.
Yes, it’s on you. Your responsibility to vote for one of two people, and to be unhappy with that conundrum if you choose. And then work to change the system, and keep working at it…
But it’s not like ketchup. With ketchup, you get what you choose. With voting, we merely get the chance to do the best we can on one particular day, and then spend years working for what we might want.

It turns out that democracy involves a lot more than voting.

This entry was posted in Consider This!, Daily Devotional and Readings, God, Leadership, Time and Space Unplugged and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s