Happy Thanksgiving

In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and Wampanoag Indians shared an autumn harvest feast that is acknowledged today as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies. For more than two centuries, days of thanksgiving were celebrated by individual colonies and states. It wasn’t until 1863, in the midst of the Civil War, that President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national Thanksgiving Day to be held each November.

Thanksgiving at Plymouth

In September 1620, a small ship called the Mayflower left Plymouth, England, carrying 102 passengers—an assortment of religious separatists seeking a new home where they could freely practice their faith and other individuals lured by the promise of prosperity and land ownership in the New World. After a treacherous and uncomfortable crossing that lasted 66 days, they dropped anchor near the tip of Cape Cod, far north of their intended destination at the mouth of the Hudson River. One month later, the Mayflower crossed Massachusetts Bay, where the Pilgrims, as they are now commonly known, began the work of establishing a village at Plymouth. Read more

Bet you didn’t know this! Video clip

And what about the Mayflower? Video clip

The Big Apple and Macy’s Parade! Video clip

The History Channel’s Thanksgiving website is a treasure trove of little known or oft forgotten facts.

Happy Thanksgiving!!

About David Mills

David is the Founder, Catalyst, and Co-creator of Workplace Hidden Opportunities. Workplace Hidden Opportunities is an information management Specialized Knowledge Platform™ (SKP™) focused exclusively on the workplace and corporate real estate. Together with the W100 a book by the same title is in progress.
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